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Squirming Worming

1 August, 2007

It’s that time when I hum and ha about deworming kittens.

Some vets recommend a protocol of deworming kittens from as young as 2 weeks of age and to repeat every 2 weeks until 3 months’ old. One argument is that worms, such as roundworms can affect the digestion and well-being of kittens, causing failure to thrive.

Another argument is that prior to vaccinating a kitten, you want to get rid of parasites, otherwise the toxic overload from dying parasites can affect the kitten’s ability to cope with the vaccination.

Then of course there’s the possibility of a kitten passing on parasites to whoever handles it.

I really don’t like the idea of having to stuff chemicals down perfectly-healthy kittens. And of these three above reasons, the second is the only one that might convince me deworming is necessary.

I don’t think you can really prevent a cat from acquiring parasites, especially if they go outdoors. Worming an adult cat every 6 months probably only keeps the parasites under control.

And if the cat is raw-fed and has a healthy immune system, it should be able to cope with parasites.

Last year I used Panacur in its liquid form for the litter of 7 kittens.  The liquid formula had to be administered by mouth for 3 days running, in order to ensure that all the parasites were killed.  It is a mixture that has the texture and consistency of white paint.  Smells like it too.

Oh my, what fun.
For 3 days I ran round the house armed with a syringe full of Panacur, chasing kittens who seemed to sense that something nasty was up.  It was like something out of the Texas Chainsaw Massacre.  And once I’d got hold of them, they squirmed like worms to escape and spat out the mixture. The carpet and floors resembled a Jackson Pollock painting executed in spatters of white.

There must be a better and easier way to do this.

Perhaps a better solution would be to get a faecal test done to see if there are any parasites. And then dose if necessary.  More later.

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